Dormy House reveals plan to shake up meeting room concept


The team at the Farncombe Estate in the Cotswolds, home to Dormy House and The Fish, has exclusively revealed to Boutique Hotelier their exciting plans for expansion of their traditional meeting room concept.

Chris Ward, commercial director and Tom Aspey, the new general manager of Dormy House and Foxhill Manor, the private house hotel on the site, told BH that they have lots in store for the 400-acre Estate.

The Estate in Broadway in the Cotswolds is already home to the 38-bed Dormy House hotel and luxury spa, Foxhill Manor, the private house hotel which opened in June 2014 and The Fish, the newest addition to the clan in the form of a 47-bed Scandi-chic boutique.

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Ward and Aspey revealed that while all three businesses still need refining, it hasn’t stopped them from dreaming big about the future, starting first by developing the meeting room into something more innovative.

The concept is based on the idea of having a meeting room that can be transported to anywhere on the Estate, using the back of a golf buggy as a giant screen and including a WiFi banner around a certain area.

“We have so many ideas!” says Ward. “The meeting room anywhere idea is an interesting one! The golf buggy with a Kindle screen and coffee machine, then big bean bags that can be strapped on, so we can then say to customers, right where do you want your meeting room?”

Ward continues: “Also what about if you were to make a meeting room a completely blank white box and then have an IT system that allows you to say to a company, right come with your requirements on a USB stick and then they plug in and the room changes to mirror their brand.

“The key thing is to not just reinvent the wheel for the sake of it. Our CEO is often quoted as saying, there is a lot of irrelevant tourism out there where guests just fit into what a hotel has done, whereas it should start with the way a guest feels. Don’t get me wrong, it’s challenging and you get it wrong as well as get it right, but fundamentally, for me, start with brand, get that right and then do the product. 99% of hoteliers start with the product then try and fit the brand. We look at the ‘why’ as much as possible,” Ward adds.